Every Rolex tells a story

While on my evening stroll during a recent business trip in London, I came across a small specialty shop in Burlington Arcade. Located in the posh part of town, about 200 meters away from the iconic Ritz hotel (note to my financial controller: I was staying in a somewhat cheaper place a few blocks away,) the boutique is called “the Vintage Watch Company.” As you can see on the photo I took, the shop window is decorated with an impressive collection of antique Rolex watches.

I must admit that the closest encounter I had with the Rolex label to date came via unsolicited emails, and through colorful street hawkers in a Far East country trying to sell me a genuine “Lolex”. But what I saw lying behind the glass certainly triggered another experience. This window display was all about emotion and brand love!

Even by just reading the texts below the many watches on display, I learned that there are rare Rolex species with an all red date, a thunderbird bezel, or a semi bubble back (whatever these may mean). And that I probably didn’t have enough cash on me to take one these vintage bling-bling chronometers home with me.

Fascinated by the subject, I went doing more online research from my hotel room. So I found on the shop’s website (with not very common, but probably very lucrative language options English, Arabic, Chinese, Japanese, and Russian) that the Vintage Watch Company owns a collection of over 1000 vintage timepieces (with some of them eve, dating back to the 1910s), has a team of 6 full-time Rolex trained watchmakers, and delivers workshops to support the collection. Wow!

Rolex is often referred to as the Rolls-Royce of watches. I don’t consider myself a connoisseur of either brands, but looking at the sales prices listed on the Vintage Watch Company’s web pages, Rolex must have a special place in the hearts (and the wallets) of many watch lovers. The  appreciations from fans around the world, like the ones I found on lovemarks.com, don’t lie:  “Rolex it is not only about telling the time, it is a label of luxury you carry on your wrist,” or “this brand is my dream and inspiration,” or “I wouldn’t trade it for any other kind of watch.

Some of their advertising campaigns were iconic too. Already in the early 1900s Rolex ran newspaper advertisements claiming that the wristwatches were for both men and women. In the 1920s they published a photograph of Mercedes Gleitze, the first British woman to swim across the Channel, to promote their first waterproof watch. But my favorite ad is the one with Sir Edmund Hillary and Reinhold Messner, the first men to summit Mount Everest – respectively with and without oxygen, but both of them with a Rolex on their wrist.

And what timekeeper do you think that James Bond was wearing in movies like Dr. No, From Russia With Love, and Goldfinger? – until Omega started supplying 007’s watches in 1995 (the first one worn by Pierce Brosnan in GoldenEye.) No surprise that there’s an Omega Vintage Boutique in the shopping arcade too, almost next door to the Rolex one.

So, here’s the lesson I took from my close encounter with Rolex in London. Every business has a unique value proposition and a compelling story to tell. So, find your niche, create your brand, tell your story, and seduce your (in this case, wealthy) customers!

Some complementary reading about Rolex and brand love:

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s